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I am very excited to announce that I will be beginning work in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania in January 2017 as the University Libraries’ Bollinger Fellow in Library Innovation through the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR).

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I have successfully defended my dissertation in Psychology at the University of Oregon, and am a PhD graduand (i.e., awaiting the conferral of the degree). My dissertation and its code and supporting files are freely available.

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This essay is really about what writing a dissertation meant to me. For me, the dissertation process was a microcosm for my entire graduate experience, in which I spent the majority of my 20s (5.5 years). I have been writing this since a month after my dissertation defense (several days before receiving final approval from the University of Oregon’s Graduate School). I am finishing it now in the hope that other doctoral students may use it as the starting point for discussion, and that it may contribute even minimally to normalizing discussion around the psychological and spiritual consequences of one (albeit of many) flavor of PhD experience.

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I introduce a new portable, single-camera book scanner design. The scanner is small enough to fit into a backpack when disassembled, and can be re-assembled in under 10 minutes. It does not require any power tools to construct; the only required tools are a tape measure, a PVC cutting tool, and scissors. A full list of parts, sizes, and prices are below, along with a video explaining the scanner’s construction and use.

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Create a beautifully simple website or blog in under 10 minutes.

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Nicole, after we spoke, I was having trouble using the pandoc wrapper within the knitr() package in R Studio -- R Studio wasn't seeing that pandoc was installed. Normally, that's not a problem, since I usually use pandoc from the bash shell. But in this case, it annoyed me. So just in case you ever do start using R Studio, here's the answer, at least for Unix-y systems like Linux and OSX: In a terminal, do echo PATH=$PATH ~/.

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From Markdown Mapper, which is GPLv2-licensed (but release this section under the Public Domain? – so Markdown Mapper overall is still GPLv2, but this can be used however): # We may want, e.g., to use 'ignore.case = TRUE' for gsub below, which means NOT using 'fixed = TRUE'. So we need to escape all of the characters in the 'From' column that could be interpreted as regular expression characters: deactivate_regular_expression_special_characters <- function(string_to_sanitize){ list_of_regular_expression_symbols_to_escape <- c( # Following the list at http://stackoverflow.

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KEEP IN MIND that I need to think carefully about licensing issues re: this (e.g., state that it’s MIT licensed, but that the code may also show up with the UO, and grant them free reign to do what they want with it, too) create_spss_style_correlation_matrix_from_corr_test <- function(corr.test.object){ # This function takes the output from the Psych package's corr.test() function and formats it like an SPSS-style correlation matrix, with r, p, and n all printed together.

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* You are now known as ooupdate * Services.GeekShed.net sets mode +r ooupdate Hi all! Does anyone here use tmux? I'm trying to connect through SSH to a tmux session that was created locally on my system. Oddly, no locally-created tmux session is listed through SSH when I use 'tmux ls', and no tmux session created through SSH is listed on my local machine. Am I missing something basic?

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setwd("/home/jacoblevernier/Documents/UO/Coursework/Winter 2014/LIB 607 Digital Scholarship Methods/Demo for Web Scraping/Example Datasets/")

# Load the jsonlite library
library(jsonlite)

# The filename for the JSON feed:
json_file <- "chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.json318_rows"

# Read that file:
json_data <- fromJSON(readLines(json_file))

# Take a look at the parsed JSON:
View(json_data)

# Examples for looking at the data:
names(json_data)
names(json_data$items)
json_data$items$place[[2]] # The "place" metadata for search result number 2

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